Incorporating video can strengthen education efforts

Short videos can be very effective for both patient and clinician education. HHQI has included multiple multimedia resources in each Best Practice Intervention Package (BPIP), including the two recent Cardiovascular Health BPIPs.

Here are some ideas on how can you use videos at your agency:

  • Include a short but meaningful video to 163743682emphasize the need for intervention strategies you are trying to implement at team meetings.
  • Share patient education videos with staff at team meetings followed by discussion of how it made them feel, whether they think it would be effective for patients, and how could they integrate the video into their clinical education.
  • Email a link to a clinician video to staff and get their feedback. Make it fun! Ask for them to send back three words that describe the impact of the video. Write a follow-up article with staff or patient quotes.
  • Create a focus group to preview and critique patient videos. Select two staff champions and ask them to use the video with a couple of patients and to share feedback as well as ideas on the types of patients for whom the video would be ideal; then share that information with the entire team. Create 4-5 evaluation questions for the staff person to ask the patient, such as:
  1. Was it easy to understand?
  2. Was there too much information or was it too long?
  3. Did you think the information related to you and your condition?
  4. What did you learn from the video? (teach-back)
  5. Do you think other people similar to you would learn from this video?

As you well know, internet speed has a huge impact on the ability to watch online videos and high-speed internet is not always available, especially in rural areas. Here are a few tips to overcome this challenge:

  • When streaming from the internet, start the video early in the visit. Let it play through with volume off during assessment, and then replay; buffering will occur faster the second time through.
  • Download the videos as a file that staff can save on their desktops. Some sites do offer that feature, but if not, write and ask for a copy. There are also programs that can download YouTube videos as a file. You can also talk with your IT department or even young people in your family (they always seem to know), but always check your agency policies and procedures for downloading from the web.

Free Video Resources in HHQI’s Cardiovascular Health BPIPs

Cardiovascular Health Part 1: Aspirin as appropriate & Blood Pressure control BPIP:

  • Page 6: “Public Health Grand Rounds on the Million Hearts® Initiative” video from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (for staff)
  • Page 22: Heart Disease & Strokes among Hispanics video from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (for patients and staff)
  • Page 32: “Heart and circulatory systems – How they work” video from the Mayo Clinic (for patients)
  • Page 32: Watch, Learn and Live Illustrations from the American Heart Association (for patients)
  • Page 32: Ischemic Stroke Animation from the American Heart Association (for patients)
  • Page 33: “Your Heart, Your Drum: Strengthening the Heartbeat of American Indians and Native Alaskans” video from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (for patients)
  • Page 34: “The Heart Truth for Women” video from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (for patients)
  • Page 44: Blood Pressure Assessment video from the New England Journal of Medicine (for staff)

Cardiovascular Health Part 2: Cholesterol management & Smoking cessation BPIP:

  • Page 31: Cardiovascular Health Improvement Success Story from the national Million Hearts® initiative (for patients and staff)
  • Page 34: Go4Life – a new exercise and physical activity campaign from the National Institute on Aging to motivate older adults to become physically active (for patients)
  • Page 55: Smoking Cessation Success Story from the national Million Hearts® initiative (for patients and staff)
  • Page 79: Multiple videos from the CDC’s “Tips from Former Smokers” national ad campaign (for patients)
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